Get Ready for Snow Removal!

SnowremovalFlickrmueritz

December is almost upon us and it’s definitely time to make sure your snow removal arsenal is in place. There are three common ways that you can use to keep your driveaways and sidewalks clear, making it safer and easier to move around your front yard.

Shoveling
I am no stranger to shoveling snow; in college, the winter portion of my job on a landscaping crew consisted of scraping away the sidewalks (often quite early in the morning) so that students could arrive at class safely. I even did it barefoot once around my house so that I could say I did and horrify people like my Southern Californian family.

Use caution when you are using a snow shovel. This is strenuous exercise and can be quite harmful if you are out of shape or have certain health issues like coronary disease, as this Yahoo! Health article advises. They also warn that you should not shovel snow between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. to avoid the greatest risk of heart attacks and other problems.  Don’t try to be a hero by grabbing the biggest shovel possible and scooping up massive loads of snow; you will likely end up with pains and injuries that way.

You may also want to use a deicer

Salts/Chemicals
Our condo complex keeps buckets of deicing salts around every staircase. These can be placed on the stairs and sidewalks to help with snow removal and melting the ice that accumulates and creates a dangerous situation.

You do need to use caution when using these products. Over time, the salts can collect around your plants and burn them. They are also strong enough to damage anything that is made of concrete. There are some types of chemicals that do not contain salt and will be easier on your yard.

Snowblowers
If you have a large yard and want to move snow quickly, get a snowblower. These machines are designed to blow away the snow as you push it along. They can be much quicker than a shovel or chemical. Since this is a machine being used in bad weather, use it carefully. Read the instruction manual to figure out where the dead man’s switch is located to shut it down safely and quickly should something fail. Turn it off completely before you remove any obstructions. Make sure you perform yearly maintenance to keep it in working order.

What method(s) do you use for your snow removal?

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Late Fall Lawn Seeding

RakingOutGrassFlickrnociveglia

Prepare your lawn by raking the areas where you wish to plant.

Winter is almost here and for the most part, your garden is ready to go to sleep until the next growing season. If your lawn is still a bit bare, though, this is the time when you can do some late fall lawn seeding! This process is also known as dormant seeding.

Your goal at this time is not to get a new lawn growing. In fact, if the seeds did start to sprout, they would almost certainly be killed when winter’s frosts hit. Instead, you are trying to get a jump start on next year’s lawn by adding seeds now that will germinate when the time is right. Place them just before the time when the ground freezes for the season. This will hopefully allow them to lay dormant throughout the cold months and be ready to awaken when the temperatures rise in spring.

Do start by preparing the patches of ground where you want to place the seeds. Make sure that the seeds are able to reach the soil and start germination. Your bag of seeds will tell you how many pounds are needed for every 1000 square feet. Once you are done spreading the seeds, irrigate the area lightly. If it is too wet, though, the possibility of problems like rots increases. 

If all goes well (a lot is up to Mother Nature in this case!), you will have an improved lawn once spring arrives and your landscape bursts back into life. 

Have you done a late fall lawn seeding? How well did it turn out?

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Plant Your Spring Flowering Bulbs in Autumn

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Winter can be pretty depressing sometimes for a plant lover like myself since so many of them have died or gone dormant and the landscape is blanketed with snow. Towards the end of the season, though, I get to witness lovely surprises like the first buds swelling on the trees and crocus leaves and flowers peeping up through the snow or bare ground. When you plant the crocus and other spring flowering bulbs in autumn, you are preparing the way for a beautiful color show in late winter and spring.

 Common Spring Flowering Bulbs That Should Be Planted in Autumn:

  • Crocus
  • Daffodils
  • Garlic (separate the cloves before planting)
  • Hyacinth
  • Snowdrops
  • Tulips

Make sure that you give your bulbs a chance to get some roots forming during the fall before winter hits and everything slows down. Plant them before the ground becomes frozen.You will want to water them a little so that the plant can function, but not enough that the soil is very moist since this increases the chances that the bulb may rot before it can really get growing.

You should first inspect and test your potential planting site. Send a soil sample to a soil laboratory so you can check the nutrient levels present. This will tell you how much is currently present so you can buy the right kind of fertilizer. This should be worked into the ground so that the roots will be able to reach and use the nutrients. You will especially want to be aware of your phosphorus levels as this is necessary for the best possible flowers.

When you plant spring flowering bulbs, they should usually be placed in a hole that is either two or three times the length of the bulb. Check the package for planting instructions to be sure for your specific kind. Look at the bulb and place it so that the tip is upward and the roots positioned downward.

What is your favorite kind of bulb to plant?

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Plan on Fertilizing Your Lawn in Fall by November 30th

FallFertilizationFlickr shaire productions

When we fertilize our lawns, we think of spring as the best time to perform this task. Fall does not seem like a likely time since the growing world is slowing down and plants are getting ready to go dormant. However, fertilizing your lawn in fall is actually one of the best things you can do to help your grass stay healthy.

During autumn, plants are busy trying to store up food to get through the cold temperatures of winter. Fertilizing your lawn in fall boosts their storage potential and makes it more likely that your grass will survive until spring. You want to perform this before it really gets too cold, however, so perform this task by November 30th each year.

As always, a good test to perform before you do any fertilizing is an assessment of the nutrient levels that are currently found in the soil. Adding too much is wasteful and can even potentially harm your plants. You can buy a simple test at your local garden center or nursery. For more detailed results, you can send off a sample to a testing laboratory like Cornell Nutrient Analysis Laboratory or your local cooperative extension service.

As Cornell University advises, you should use “1 pound of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet. (1 lb. N/1,000 ft.2). Use a fertilizer that is about 70 percent slow-release nitrogen” Once you have applied the nutrients, water your lawn so that the fertilizer can travel down into the soil. 

As always, feel free to give us a call if you would like us to do your fall lawn fertilization this year.

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Order Your Garden Catalogs Now

 

I wish prices were still this low. 5 cents for a packet of seeds?

I wish prices were still this low. 5 cents for a packet of seeds?

As winter approaches, your garden may start to seem a bit dreary. One way that you can help beat these winter blahs is to pore over garden catalogs. You can do this electronically, but I prefer having an actual paper version to look at whenever I fancy.

If you order in fall, the latest and greatest edition will show up in the middle of winter. Companies are eager to show off their newest cultivars. These are cultivated varieties, which are the different kinds of plants found within a species that are not different enough to have their own species. Cultivated means that a company has nurtured and developed it. Honeycrisp is an apple cultivar, for example.

These garden catalogs can also help you work smarter with your landscaping company. You can cut out pictures and descriptions (do remember to include the names, especially the scientific species when possible) to help them know what you are looking to have done. Do keep in mind, though, that not every plant is suitable for your situation and you may have to pass on some species. Your professional landscaper should be able to help you know if your favorites will grow in your yard.

Here are three of my favorite garden catalogs:

Park Seed was my catalog of choice growing up, along with Burpee. I loved leafing through the pages and trying to see how far I could stretch my meager savings. These companies have been around for a long time and offer a wide variety of plants.

If you are thinking of planting a vegetable garden as part of your landscape, you simply MUST get the Baker Creek catalog. They offer heirloom varieties that you will usually not be able to get locally. The pictures are simply gorg!eous to boot

What are your favorite garden catalogs to order every year?

When Should You Cut Down Perennials?

Path lined by blue fescues

Blue fescue will add pops of color all winter long if you wait until spring to cut down this perennial grass.

The growing season is winding down and you may wonder when to cut down your perennials for best success. These plants last more than one season and may have become untidy. For many, fall is a great time, with the caveat that you need to consider how it will affect the look of your garden overall.

The Basics of Cutting Down Perennials

These types of plants may be trimmed either in spring or in fall. Many people like to do it in fall as part of putting their garden to rest for the season. This can be beneficial for the plant if it has faced problems like leaf diseases or insect damage.

When you do decide to cut them down, leave about three inches of stem instead of cutting it down to the ground so that you do not damage the plant.

Don’t Destroy Your Winter Interest

I grew up in Southern California where plants are perpetually growing and the landscape is always full of vibrant colors. As I discovered later when I moved to a colder region, things can get pretty dull during the winter when not much (if anything) is growing and your yard is covered in snow.

If you do decide to cut down your perennials in fall, you will have to wait until spring’s new growth generates excitement in your garden. Many perennials can add winter interest to your garden with parts like colorful stems, foliage and fruits. The latter can also serve as food for wildlife and birds. Unless 

As Cornell University mentions, perennials like “European ginger, bishop’s hat, ferns, Lenten rose, ornamental grasses, and upright sedums (such as ‘Autumn Joy’)” should be cut back in the spring instead of the fall.

Do you cut down your perennials in the fall? Do you have any that provide winter interest?

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Color Planning for Your Garden in the Fall

Cotoneasters have great fall foliiage and fruit

            Fall color on a cotoneaster

Fall is a great time to do some color planning for your garden. You can look at other people’s yards and see ideas for plants that are blooming and changing foliage color at this time. If you decide that you want to add some new trees and shrubs for fall interest next year, many can be planted successfully at this time; in fact, for many, this is the ideal time instead of spring. This is also the time to start considering what spring flowering bulbs you will want to plant soon, which we will cover in a subsequent post.

Three Types of Trees That Provide Fall Colors

Maples are likely the first trees that come to mind when we think of autumn foliage. The palm shaped leaves come in a wide assortment of shades like red, orange, yellow, purple and brown. Depending on the species you choose (some produce better than others), you can also tap them in late winter to make maple syrup.

Oak trees also put on a good show with their leaves in hues of red, yellow, brown and orange. The acorns can also be used to make fall decorations for your house.

Aspen trees have foliage that turns yellow in autumn. Since these are often found in higher elevations where evergreens live, the pop of color is especially lovely. This can work for your garden too as a focal point.

Three Types of Shrubs That Provide Fall Colors

Cotoneasters are sturdy shrubs that will brighten up your landscape with their scarlet foliage and fruit. Two to look for are the rockspray cotoneaster and the willowleaf cotoneaster.

An underused shrub is the redvein enkianthus, which provides several seasons of color. In the spring it produces gorgeous clusters of white flowers with pink veins. In fall, the foliage becomes orange, red or yellow.

Serviceberries have white flowers that turn into edible fruits. In autumn, the leaves will turn to orange and red.

What are your favorite ways to add color in the fall?

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Watering Your Trees and Shrubs in the Fall

Fall leaves

We don’t really think about watering our trees and shrubs (or other plants, for that matter) during the winter since snow is made up of water, after all. However, since the ground is often frozen and it is difficult for water to reach the roots, it is essential that you follow a special watering schedule in the fall so that you will have the best possible outcome for your trees and shrubs.

Beginning of Fall

As fall begins, you should stop watering your trees and shrubs for a few weeks. Rainfall should take care of the plants’ needs naturally. If you were to water at this time, the tree would start sending out new leaves and growth. When the first frosts hit, this would be a recipe for disaster as the tender stems are susceptible to cold damage. Let the deciduous trees finish up their leaf change and food storage. Evergreen trees will not change their leaves, of course, nor will they entirely stop growing during the winter. It is especially important that you make sure they get some watering before frosts.

Late Fall

Once the leaves have changed colors and fallen off, you should start watering again as needed. If it is raining frequently, you do not need to worry about doing this. As is the case with your lawns, you do not want to water frequently and shallowly. Do a deep watering every few days to encourage the roots to dive downward. This will help them find water during the winter and be protected from freezing temperatures.

As soon as the first frosts start occurring, stop watering your trees and shrubs. This is especially important if there is snow on the ground. If you have added enough water, your trees and shrubs will have a better chance of surviving the drought conditions of winter.

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Fall Lawn Fertilization

FertilizerBostonLibraryMany people think that spring is the optimal time to fertilize your lawn. It makes sense, right? The plants are just waking up and need a burst of nutrients to get them off to a good start. However, what you really need to focus on is fall lawn fertilization to keep your grass at its best. Choosing this time means that your grass roots will grow and strengthen themselves, improving the overall system. Fertilizing in spring (especially if that is the only time that you do it) is not as good since it encourages blade growth more, resulting in more mowing and potential problems.

The first step you should perform before any fertilization is to do a soil test. You would run into trouble if your soil already happened to have had good (or a bit overabundant) levels of the main nutrients (N-nitrogen, P-Phosphorus, K-Potassium) and you added more unknowingly. This also helps you check the levels of other nutrients and make sure that you get the correct blend. Here in NY, you can contact the Cornell Nutrient Analysis Laboratory or the local Extension Service for testing.

Once you know that you should indeed add a round of fertilization, wait for the right window. If you maintain your lawn frequently, Cornell University advises that you should do a round of fertilization at a rate of one pound for every 1000 square feet in your yard around Labor Day and another in November before Thanksgiving. If your yard is a bit more low key, only the November feeding is necessary.

Know your first freeze dates and watch the weather. If you try to fertilize when it is warm in late fall, a cold snap that is likely around the corner will negate your efforts and even raise the potential of damage from freezing temperatures.

 

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Tune Up Your Sprinkler System for Fall

FallLawnFlickrmikecogh

Your grass may have needed extra water throughout the summer to help it combat heat and drought. As fall approaches, though, it is time to adjust your sprinkler system for the last few months of the growing season.

In autumn, the temperatures start falling. Rainstorms start happening more frequently. With these changes in the weather, it makes sense that you will need to irrigate less. You especially want to make sure that you do not stimulate excessive new growth as it may be damaged from early frosts. You do not want to completely stop watering yet, though. Your plants are busy storing up reserves before they go dormant and need a moderate amount of irrigation.

Consider installing a rain sensor in your sprinkler system as this is designed to override your scheduled sessions should it start to rain. This will save your lawn from being over-watered (keeping it healthier and saving you money) and conserve in the landscape to boot. These days they range from simple electric devices to high tech systems with Wi-Fi capability.

Near the end of autumn, you also want to start winterizing your system so that the pipes will not burst. This is a process where you remove all liquids from the system before the frosts get into full swing. After water is drained out, an air compressor is used to blow out any remaining moisture. Call us to get help in making sure that your system is properly winterized and avoid costly damage.

When do you start winterizing your sprinkler system?
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